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April 29, 2013 / Gregory Williams

Last Batch of the Season

It generally does not get warm around Seattle until mid-June, if then. By warm I mean over 80 degrees Fahrenheit, or about 27 Celsius.

The cool weather has its disadvantages when it comes to outdoor activities, but it does allow for late winter batches at a time of the year when temperatures in much of the US could turn too warm for proper fermentation. The ideal range for the beer I usually brew is between 65-75 degrees Fahrenheit.

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This carboy was filled with just over four and a half gallons of Buckaroo Dark that had been in secondary fermentation for about four weeks.

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I never pay for bottles, I pay for beer. In my opinion a good bottle for home brew should come with beer already in it.

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This beer will be officially ready to drink in about two weeks. Even so, after one week I will crack open one of the twelve ounce bottles to make sure that priming is going smoothly. The goal is a CO2 volume of about 2.3, a little less than most American beers and a little more than most English Ales. Believe it or not there is actually a troubleshooting process that can be followed to determine why bottle primed beers are not priming as expected. Checking after a week’s time means less waiting if there is a problem.

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One Comment

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  1. Derek / May 4 2013 4:59 am

    One of these days I will try and make wine again, sober this time 😀

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